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xkcd.com/353 ( Flying with Python )
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HenHanna
2024-03-30 06:21:15 UTC
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https://xkcd.com/353/ ( Flying with Python )




https://xkcd.com/1306/
what does SIGIL mean?



Other xkcd that you like?
Greg Ewing
2024-03-30 07:04:00 UTC
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Post by HenHanna
https://xkcd.com/1306/
                         what does  SIGIL   mean?
I think its' a Perl term, referring to the $/@/# symbols in front of
identifiers.
--
Greg
HenHanna
2024-03-30 10:00:16 UTC
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Post by Greg Ewing
Post by HenHanna
https://xkcd.com/1306/
                         what does  SIGIL   mean?
identifiers.
thanks!

https://www.explainxkcd.com/wiki/index.php/1306:_Sigil_Cycle
Skip Montanaro
2024-03-30 11:25:57 UTC
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Post by Greg Ewing
Post by HenHanna
https://xkcd.com/1306/
what does SIGIL mean?
identifiers.
I had a vague recollection of hearing it elsewhere (*Game of Thrones,* on
the armies' battle flags?), but didn't know what it meant. Google tells me:

*an inscribed or painted symbol considered to have magical power.*

So, they're more than just line noise. They confer power on their users...

Perhaps '@' in the context of decorators is the most prominent example in
Python, since decorators technically don't allow the programmer to do
something they couldn't before, but are now are used everywhere, a key
feature of many applications and modules.

Magical-ly, y'rs,

Skip
MRAB
2024-03-30 16:31:59 UTC
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Post by Skip Montanaro
Post by Greg Ewing
Post by HenHanna
https://xkcd.com/1306/
what does SIGIL mean?
identifiers.
I had a vague recollection of hearing it elsewhere (*Game of Thrones,* on
*an inscribed or painted symbol considered to have magical power.*
So, they're more than just line noise. They confer power on their users...
Python, since decorators technically don't allow the programmer to do
something they couldn't before, but are now are used everywhere, a key
feature of many applications and modules.
Magical-ly, y'rs,
I wouldn't consider '@' to be a sigil any more than I would a unary minus.
In Perl there's the prefixes $ (scalar), @ (array) and %
(hash/dictionary), but also & (function), although it's rare because
there's also the () afterwards.

Variables in PHP have the prefix $ and only $.

In old versions of BASIC, string variables had the suffix $, and integer
variables the suffix %. Some versions also had the suffix # (for double
precision, I think).
Alan Gauld
2024-03-30 17:58:08 UTC
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Post by Greg Ewing
Post by HenHanna
https://xkcd.com/1306/
                         what does  SIGIL   mean?
identifiers.
There seem to be several derivation sources including a fantasy world
city suspended above a very thin, tall steeple....

Personally, I know SIGIL as an opensource EPUB editor!

None of them seem to have any direct connection to the xkcd cartoon.
--
Alan G
Author of the Learn to Program web site
http://www.alan-g.me.uk/
http://www.amazon.com/author/alan_gauld
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Mats Wichmann
2024-03-31 18:27:34 UTC
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Post by Greg Ewing
Post by HenHanna
https://xkcd.com/1306/
                           what does  SIGIL   mean?
identifiers.
Nonetheless, Perl folk do use that term, specifically.

"One thing that distinguishes Perl from other languages is its use of
sigils; the funny looking symbols placed in front of variable names. "

$ Scalar $foo
@ Array @foo
% Hash %foo
& Subroutine &foo
* Typeglob *foo
Sigils have many benefits, not least of which is that variables
can be interpolated into strings with no additional syntax. Perl scripts
are also easy to read (for people who have bothered to learn Perl!)
because the nouns stand out from verbs. And new verbs can be added to
the language without breaking old scripts.
Programming Perl, Chapter 1, 4th Edition
etc.
Peter J. Holzer
2024-03-31 18:27:07 UTC
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Post by Alan Gauld
Post by Greg Ewing
Post by HenHanna
https://xkcd.com/1306/
                         what does  SIGIL   mean?
identifiers.
Correct (although strictly speaking they are in front of an expression,
not an identifier).
Post by Alan Gauld
There seem to be several derivation sources including a fantasy world
city suspended above a very thin, tall steeple....
Personally, I know SIGIL as an opensource EPUB editor!
Well, it's an ordinary English word of Latin origin (sigillum means
literally "small sign") in use since the 15th century. No need to go
hunting for proper names.
Post by Alan Gauld
None of them seem to have any direct connection to the xkcd cartoon.
In my opinion the connection to Perl sigils is very direct.

hp
--
_ | Peter J. Holzer | Story must make more sense than reality.
|_|_) | |
| | | ***@hjp.at | -- Charles Stross, "Creative writing
__/ | http://www.hjp.at/ | challenge!"
Peter J. Holzer
2024-03-31 18:53:41 UTC
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Post by Mats Wichmann
Post by Greg Ewing
Post by HenHanna
https://xkcd.com/1306/
                           what does  SIGIL   mean?
identifiers.
[You cut out a lot of context here]
Post by Mats Wichmann
Nonetheless, Perl folk do use that term, specifically.
I'm pretty sure he's referring to the use of @ in python to denote a
decorator here. Which is a totally different thing than a Perl sigil.

hp
--
_ | Peter J. Holzer | Story must make more sense than reality.
|_|_) | |
| | | ***@hjp.at | -- Charles Stross, "Creative writing
__/ | http://www.hjp.at/ | challenge!"
Blue-Maned_Hawk
2024-03-30 17:32:20 UTC
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Post by HenHanna
https://xkcd.com/1306/
what does SIGIL mean?
I'd define a sigil as a mandatory symbol used to indicate the properties
of a name.
--
Blue-Maned_Hawk│shortens to Hawk│/blu.mɛin.dʰak/│he/him/his/himself/Mr.
blue-maned_hawk.srht.site
“Do you know what you are?” “Confused?”
HenHanna
2024-04-03 23:08:21 UTC
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Post by Blue-Maned_Hawk
Post by HenHanna
https://xkcd.com/1306/
what does SIGIL mean?
I'd define a sigil as a mandatory symbol used to indicate the properties
of a name.
if i'm getting this right... Sigil is part of the language spec,

whereas (in Lisp in the old days), there was a convention of using var-name like *foo* to
indicate it's a dynamic variable.

and sometimes **foo** for ....

and %foo% or %%foo%% was used for ...........

Johanne Fairchild
2024-03-30 21:09:56 UTC
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Post by HenHanna
https://xkcd.com/1306/
what does SIGIL mean?
A glyph used in magic. Or, for Perl, the symbol in front of a variable
name, such as $, @, and %.

Source:
https://perldoc.perl.org/perlglossary#sigil

Sigil is noun. Definitions:

A seal; a signet.
A sign or an image considered magical.
A seal; a signature.

Source:
The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language,
5th Edition.
HenHanna
2024-03-30 21:34:03 UTC
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Post by Johanne Fairchild
Post by HenHanna
https://xkcd.com/1306/
what does SIGIL mean?
A glyph used in magic. Or, for Perl, the symbol in front of a variable
Source: https://perldoc.perl.org/perlglossary#sigil
A seal; a signet.
A sign or an image considered magical.
A seal; a signature.
Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.
omg... Sigil is a real word???


The word "sigil" comes from the Latin term "sigillum," which means "little sign." This Latin root is also the source of our English word "seal," making "sigil" and "seal" doublets.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/sigil



__________________________words that we use in Programming but not Found in a real dictionary :

Camel case , int, char, min, len, def, elseif

cons, defun, cond, goto,
inhahe
2024-04-01 17:30:27 UTC
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On Mon, Apr 1, 2024 at 1:26 PM HenHanna via Python-list <
Post by Johanne Fairchild
Post by Johanne Fairchild
Post by HenHanna
https://xkcd.com/1306/
what does SIGIL mean?
A glyph used in magic. Or, for Perl, the symbol in front of a variable
Source: https://perldoc.perl.org/perlglossary#sigil
A seal; a signet.
A sign or an image considered magical.
A seal; a signature.
Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English
Language, 5th Edition.
omg... Sigil is a real word???
The word "sigil" comes from the Latin term "sigillum," which means "little
sign." This Latin root is also the source of our English word "seal,"
making "sigil" and "seal" doublets.
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/sigil
I understand "sigil" as referring to symbols occultists make up and use to
aid in their magick.
PA
2024-04-01 18:21:08 UTC
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Post by Johanne Fairchild
A seal; a signet.
A sign or an image considered magical.
A seal; a signature.
Creating Sigils
The origin and design process informing Urbit's generative user avatar system, Sigils.
https://urbit.org/blog/creating-sigils

Implementation example:

https://github.com/textprotocol/sigil
PA
2024-04-01 18:21:08 UTC
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Post by Johanne Fairchild
A seal; a signet.
A sign or an image considered magical.
A seal; a signature.
Creating Sigils
The origin and design process informing Urbit's generative user avatar system, Sigils.
https://urbit.org/blog/creating-sigils

Implementation example:

https://github.com/textprotocol/sigil
HenHanna
2024-04-03 21:50:26 UTC
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https://xkcd.com/353/      ( Flying with  Python )
https://xkcd.com/1306/
                      what does  SIGIL   mean? -- (i got it...Thanks!)
Other  xkcd   that you like?
my fav. one may be the one about [Bad-ass Hacker] [Nice-ass car].


Does he use Python? i wonder.
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